Safety Awareness: Protect Your Hands

Posted by Professional Tree Climber on 2/20/2018

Out of all the infuriating things that can happen throughout the day at work, the thing that really makes an impression on those cold days is the searing pain that screams from your fingertips when an unwieldy branch lets loose and gives you a good crack across your pinky finger! This is the one of the absolute “joys” of working outside during the icy Midwest winters. But guess what? For all of you who have been through this same horror, there’s an answer for the pain we’ve all surely endured! 

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Safety Awareness: Protect Your Legs

Posted by Professional Tree Climber on 2/12/2018

Have you ever used a chainsaw before? More than likely, yes. Unless you are just doing some very fine ornamental pruning, you have used a chainsaw in your day-to-day work routine! More than likely you use a chainsaw almost all day long for hours on end. The big question is, what type of chainsaw protection are you employing?

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Safety Awareness: Protect Your Eyes

Posted by Professional Tree Climber on 2/8/2018

To keep moving forward with our month of safety articles and discounted product that we hope will help you stock up on all the safety gear you need, let’s take a look at safety glasses and what makes a pair of safety glasses approved for work in the tree care industry. Just because you have a pair of glasses on doesn’t mean that they are actually rated for the hazards that we are exposed to while doing tree work. Maybe you picked up a pair of cheapo glasses at the gas station in the morning or you brought in your super high dollar polarized glasses for when you are out on the boat? Are either of these any better than the other at protecting your eyes? Most probably not.

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Safety Awareness: Protect Your Head

Posted by Professional Tree Climber on 2/5/2018

Did you know that “struck-bys” are the number one cause of injury and death in the tree industry? That means that more and more people are killed every year by branches, logs, or trees falling on them and striking them somewhere on the body or head. That is an awful lot of injuries and deaths that could possibly be reduced or avoided altogether. So what would be the best way to reduce climbing accidents you ask? Protective climbing helmets and effective communication!

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